Eats, Shoots & Leaves

Eats, Shoots & Leaves

The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation

Book - 2004
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Penguin Putnam
We all know the basics of punctuation. Or do we? A look at most neighborhood signage tells a different story. Through sloppy usage and low standards on the internet, in email, and now text messages, we have made proper punctuation an endangered species. In Eats, Shoots & Leaves, former editor Lynne Truss dares to say, in her delightfully urbane, witty, and very English way, that it is time to look at our commas and semicolons and see them as the wonderful and necessary things they are. This is a book for people who love punctuation and get upset when it is mishandled. From the invention of the question mark in the time of Charlemagne to George Orwell shunning the semicolon, this lively history makes a powerful case for the preservation of a system of printing conventions that is much too subtle to be mucked about with.

Baker & Taylor
Looks at the history of punctuation and the rules governing the use of apostrophes, commas, dashes, hyphens, colons, and semicolons.

Blackwell North Amer
We all know the basics of punctuation. Or do we? A look at most neighborhood signage tells a different story. Through sloppy usage and low standards on the internet, in email, and now text messages, we have made proper punctuation an endangered species. In Eats, Shoots & Leaves, former editor Lynne Truss dares to say, in her delightfully urbane, witty, and very English way, that it is time to look at our commas and semicolons and see them as the wonderful and necessary things they are. This is a book for people who love punctuation and get upset when it is mishandled. From the invention of the question mark in the time of Charlemagne to George Orwell shunning the semicolon, this lively history makes a powerful case for the preservation of a system of printing conventions that is much too subtle to be mucked about with.

Publisher: New York : Gotham Books, 2004
ISBN: 9781592400874
1592400876
9781592402038
1592402038
Branch Call Number: 428.2 TRU
Characteristics: xxvii, 209 p
Alternative Title: Eats, shoots, and leaves

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FloraWest
Jun 05, 2020

What a really funny book this is. I mean, I wasn't expecting anything as dry as a newspaper style guide but I also wasn't expecting a laugh out loud book about punctuation. Dry British wit as some good tips on comma use.

w
writermala
Apr 16, 2020

I was going to add an Oxford comma to this title till I realized it was a tongue in cheek attempt at poking fun at poor writers. The cover page is beautifully illustrated with a panda whitening out a comma with a paint brush. Lynne Truss has written a wonderful and humorous book about what one would consider a very boring subject - grammar. The book is subtitled "The Zero Approach to Punctuation" and indeed Truss doesn't tolerate bad grammar. At the end of it we, the readers will become like her and the world will become a better place.

i
imoote
Dec 02, 2019

This is a very good and surprisingly funny book about proper punctuation usage.

I've been looking for an explanation of the Canadian practice of writing 'space, hyphen, space' like this - but I haven't found it in any of the punctuation books I have consulted. Adios, amigos, or in Canadian, adious, amigous. Yes. Indeedy.

b
becker
Dec 27, 2018

Who Knew punctuation could be this fun? A quirky little book but very enjoyable.

l
LouiseCLF
Nov 06, 2018

Not funny to me. I got impatient reading each chapter, waiting for her to make the point about punctuation so I could see if I knew that point yet or not.

j
Janice21383
Sep 28, 2017

If we had a dollar for every grammatical error we see daily, we would be rich, rich! But unfortunately, my plan for a system of language abuse fines went nowhere.* However, Lynne Truss's little book is here to set us straight. More a diatribe than an instructional book (Strunk & White's Elements of Style still sets the standard -- and is available online), Truss explains not only what is correct, but also why it matters to get it right. *One error I would fine for is mixing up "it's" and "its". I am probably preaching to the choir here, but "it's" is short for "it is". And like "yours", "its" is possessive, and means "belonging to it". No need to stick in an apostrophe. Got it? Because no one believes excuses about your autocorrect messing that up.

k
KayALDes
Aug 22, 2017

If you love grammar and you love to laugh you will love this book!

ArapahoeStaff20 Feb 01, 2017

It never surprises me how an honest perspective can be totally amusing. The author is fiercely passionate and gives several excellent examples of why good punctuation is still important.

t
twinston781
Dec 04, 2014

Grammarians and layfolk alike will appreciate this humorous look at common English punctuation errors.

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geniusgirl613 Jun 24, 2013

geniusgirl613 thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

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SarahFly
Jun 20, 2014

No matter that you have a PhD and have read all of Henry James twice. If you still persist in writing, "Good food at it's best", you deserve to be struck by lightning, hacked up on the spot and buried in an unmarked grave. p.44

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