21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act

21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act

Helping Canadians Make Reconciliation With Indigenous Peoples A Reality

Book - 2018
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"Based on a viral article, 21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act is the essential guide to understanding the legal document and its repercussion on generations of Indigenous peoples, written by a leading cultural sensitivity trainer. The Indian Act, after 141 years, continues to shape, control, and constrain the lives and opportunities of Indigenous peoples, and is at the root of many lasting stereotypes. Bob Joseph's book comes at a key time in the reconciliation process, when awareness from both Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities is at a crescendo. Joseph explains how Indigenous peoples can step out from under the Indian Act and return to self-government, self-determination, and self-reliance-and why doing so would result in a better country for every Canadian. He dissects the complex issues around truth and reconciliation, and clearly demonstrates why learning about the Indian Act's cruel, enduring legacy is essential for the country to move toward true reconciliation."-- Provided by publisher.
Publisher: Port Coquitlam, British Columbia : Indigenous Relations Press, [2018]
Copyright Date: ©2018
ISBN: 9780995266520
Branch Call Number: 342. 71087 JOS 2018-06
Characteristics: 189 pages ; 21 cm

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Based on a viral article, 21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act is a guide to understanding the legal document and its repercussion on generations of Indigenous peoples, written by a leading cultural sensitivity trainer. The Indian Act, after 141 years, continues to shape, control, and ... Read More »


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Boych2018
Dec 08, 2020

Every Canadian (including Indians and Metis) should read this book. And, every Canadian should read 13 Things That Can't Be Said About Aboriginal Law and Policy In Canada.

In the Introduction Robert Joseph states the Indian Act should be dismantled and Aboriginals should be self-reliant and self-governing. I agree - provided Canadian law is the ultimate arbitrator.

21 Things is an excellent primer for the non native Canadian interested in Aboriginal mistreatment. The book clearly outlines how successive federal governments tried, until recently, to assimilate Aboriginals. That said, atoning for past wrongs by creating special laws for different people based on race, lineage and culture is a sure way to create future trouble not reconciliation.

Aboriginal culture is now celebrated. Indians and Metis currently enjoy special privileges but I suspect that will not be the case once the general public fully grasps the fact that they're in a two caste system. More truth is needed for true reconciliation to proceed.

Canada and the world have changed in 257 years. Attempting to structure Canadian society around a 1763 Royal Proclamation that satisfies the conventions of a time that has passed is nonsense. Aboriginals do not want to give up Western education, technology, medicine or special status and go back to their 1763 standard of living. Millions of Canadians will not move to their ancestral country of origin. New immigrants come to escape discrimination not to become second class citizens.

Those who promote reconciliation should make it clear all races will be treated equally (not equitably) and they will only work with groups or individuals prepared to participate on that basis. Canadians would accept this.

In time they’ll ask why our politicians ever thought our society should be divided along racial lines with one race receiving special privilege over all others in a racially diverse society.

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brenpladsen
Aug 28, 2018

This is a very readable primer to the legal issues and the parallel history to the one taught in Canadian history.

SPL_Shauna Jul 09, 2018

This book is an excellent introduction to some of the history and issues around Canada's Indian Act. The writing is clear, engaging, and well-organized, so despite the weighty topic I blew through it in 3 days, and I'm a mom who works full time.

This is obviously a book written for those who want to take action; all the information is immediately useful and provides good talking points. And, don't skip the appendices! They include all 94 of the TRC's recommendations, and some very illuminating quotes from government officials involved in the creation and administration of the Indian Act. Highly recommended for anyone hoping to advocate for Indigenous rights.

patcumming Jun 29, 2018

Highly informative

superglu2 Apr 30, 2018

Based on Bob Joseph's 2015 blog post that went viral

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